New Year’s Eve

January 2, 2011 | Top News

Sydney Harbour Bridge (Photo:Wolter Peeters)

The year 2011 was welcomed with spectacular fireworks display across the globe. Although Kiribati, one of the islands in the Pacific, had the first New Year, the major fireworks started in Auckland, New Zealand.  The 328-metere Sky Tower, the tallest man-made structure in the country, was the centre of the explosions of white, red and gold burst while thousands of people watching below shouted and danced.

The second and the best fireworks display was at the famous Sydney Harbour Bridge.  Around 1.5 million people watched the gigantic sparklers and multicoloured starbusts that lit the sky above the harbour. Another amazing fireworks display combined with laser lights was held in Dubai’s 828-metre Burj Khalifa Tower which is the tallest building in the world. In London, people gathered around the banks of Thames river to witness the 8-minute fireworks show. And in New York, million spectators watched the lighted and dazzling crystal ball drop down a flagpole in Times Square.

In Taipei, the fireworks was displayed as lights that spriralled and climbed the tallest building in the city. It was in a form of a dragon, which is usually associated with wisdom and longevity in Asia.    And in Hong Kong, fireworks display lighted the roofs of 10 famous buildings along Victoria Harbor.

What is the origin of the fireworks display? A firework is an explosive device that produces lights or loud noise and used during special events or celebrations.  It was first used during the ancient times in China, the country that invented the gun powder.  In the 13th and 14th centuries, the Europeans who travelled to Asia, introduced fireworks display in Europe and was used as a sight to impress and to celebrate special events.

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